Mini Review: Girl at the Grave by Teri Bailey Black

Hi everyone. It’s been quite awhile since I’ve posted. Life got hectic again, but I’m here to post a mini review of a book I just finished and really enjoyed.

Girl at the Grave by Teri Bailey Black

Screen Shot 2018-07-15 at 2.35.50 PM

Synopsis:

Valentine has spent years trying to outrun her mother’s legacy. But small towns have long memories, and when a new string of murders occurs, all signs point to the daughter of a murderer.

Only one person believes Valentine is innocent—Rowan Blackshaw, the son of the man her mother killed all those years ago. Valentine vows to find the real killer, but when she finally uncovers the horrifying truth, she must choose to face her own dark secrets, even if it means losing Rowan in the end.

Review:

The book started a bit slow for me, but it really picked up steam as I progressed. I loved the main character Valentine. She was strong, independent, kind, but also had her flaws. The characters of Rowan & Sam were both well developed and added so much to the story. I’m not a huge fan of love triangles, and at times was frustrated with this one, but I like how everything was explained in the end. The mysteries of what happened in Feavers Crossing (both past and present) really kept me hooked. While I was able to figure who committed one of the bigger mysteries, I would never have guessed why. I loved the twists and turns this story took as well as the setting. If a second book was ever written, I’d definitely purchase it.

Goodreads | Amazon | B&N

Advertisements

The Devil’s Work by Mark Edwards: Review

screen-shot-2016-09-07-at-9-31-15-pmSynopsis:

It was the job she had dreamed of since childhood. But on her very first day, when an unnerving encounter drags up memories Sophie Greenwood would rather forget, she wonders if she has made a mistake. A fatal mistake.

What is her ambitious young assistant really up to? And what exactly happened to Sophie’s predecessor? When her husband and daughter are pulled into the nightmare, Sophie is forced to confront the darkest secrets she has carried for years.

As her life begins to fall apart at work and at home, Sophie must race to uncover the truth about her new job…before it kills her.

Book published by: Thomas & Mercer
Release Date: September, 13, 2016

Goodreads|B&N|Amazon

The Devil’s Work is a psychological thriller that takes place in England, which only made me want to read this book even more. I love the setting Mark Edwards chose and that the main character is a working mother. When the book first starts, Sophie is returning to the work force after taking four years off to be with her daughter. She has her dream job at a children’s publishing company and things seem to be looking good. As we soon find out, things are not as good as they seem. Her predecessor went missing, she loses one of her team members, and one of the other team members seems a little too overzealous. Sophie begins to grow suspicious of her assistant Cassie and things escalate from there.

While Sophie is dealing with all this in real time, the book has flashbacks to her days at University. We as readers find out that she used to be best friends with her employer’s (publishing company’s owner) granddaughter. This timeline too, has numerous twist and turns along with shady characters. I enjoyed the flashbacks because they added more depth to the story without seeming forced.

This book takes the reader on a rollercoaster of emotions and keeps you guessing. I was enthralled while reading it and couldn’t wait to see the outcome. I also loved the mystery that Sophie’s University years added. I highly recommend this book if you like psychological thrillers.

The wonderful people at Wunderkind provided me with this ARC for an honest review.

screen-shot-2016-09-07-at-10-23-50-pm

About Mark Edwards: Mark Edwards is the author of psychological thrillers, each of which concerns ordinary people who encounter terrifying events, and police procedurals with Louise Voss. Edwards lives in Wolverhampton, England.

Website|Twitter

Photo Mark Earthy   www.earthyphotography.co.uk